WHAT IS MOUNTAIN COUNTRY HOMES OF HOPE?

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Mountain Country Homes of Hope was originally called Mountain Country Habitat for Humanity, founded as an HFHI affiliate in 1987 by Jack Herschend and Silver Dollar City. Our mission was simple: To give working, low-income families in Taney and Stone Counties the opportunity to own a safe, decent and affordable home in which to live and nurture their family. We built our first homes in Taney County in 1988. Three of the original five families selected to receive homes remained in the program until their 20-year mortgage was paid off in 2008 and 2009, respectively.

In 2006, our board of directors recognized that Habitat International was diverging from the principles on which the ministry was originally founded; principles which we continued to follow. We chose to disaffiliate from HFHI, and reincorporated as Mountain Country Homes of Hope. We built our first Homes of Hope home that year: The Aluminum Can House.

Five of the homes we built were completed in a five-day blitz-build. The first in 1994 was “The Believe It or Not House.” In 2000, two homes were built simultaneously, the “Ozark Mountain Bank House,” and the “Mitsubishi Electronics House.” The 2003 blitz-build, “The Homeland America House,” and the 2007 blitz-build, the “Branson-Hollister Rotary Club House,” was built by a contingent of volunteer, military personnel from Ft. Leonard Wood. Eleven of our homes were built by corporate or foundation sponsors, but most of the funding came from grants, fund raising events, proceeds from our Warehouse Store, aluminum recycling and direct donations. We never accepted government funding. Over twenty-six years, MCHH has built and/or refurbished a total of 46 homes providing a safe and nurturing environment for almost 300 individuals.

Although we now focus all of our energy and resources toward our ReBuilding Hope for Seniors program (which we started in 2008), we maintain a strong partnership with our homeowners. We celebrate their successes, and step in with encouragement and support when requested. Our homeownership program sought to empower our partner families by providing them with the opportunity to obtain a home of their own, and working with them to achieve that goal. We endeavored to break the poverty-cycle mind-set and entitlement process. Over the course of our twenty plus year history, we have found that the majority of the children of our partner families are pursuing higher education and job status with the determination to work towards owning their own home. Many have achieved that… and more.